Hybrid technology from Porsche and Bosch

With the 918 Spyder, the Panamera S E-Hybrid and the Cayenne S E-Hybrid, Porsche was the first car manufacturer in the world to offer three plug-in hybrid models. Among the suppliers Porsche relies on for the innovative drive system is Bosch. The possibilities offered by the combination of an internal combustion engine and an electric motor will impressively be demonstrated by the Porsche hybrid vehicles at the 62nd International Automotive Press Briefing at the Boxberg test track, starting May 19.

“We promised to redefine driving pleasure, efficiency and performance with the 918 Spyder. We kept our word, and in so doing repositioned hybrid technology”, says Wolfgang Hatz, Member of the Executive Board – Research and Development at Porsche AG. The Porsche 918 Spyder1) was the first globally road-legal car to complete the 20.6 kilometre lap of the North Loop of the Nürburgring in less than seven minutes. At exactly six minutes and 57 seconds, this super sports car with plug-in hybrid drive beat the existing record by 14 seconds. Porsche also integrated the knowledge gained from the develop-ment of the technology demonstrator into the electrification of the rest of its model range. The Panamera S E-Hybrid2) and Cayenne S E-Hybrid3) round off the product range and make Porsche the global market leader for hybrid cars in the premium segment.

“Porsche and Bosch have teamed up to bring electrification to electrifying sports cars together. Electricity gives added driving pleasure and efficiency”, says Dr. Rolf Bulander, Chairman of the Business Sector Mobility Solutions at Bosch. For the three plug-in models made by Porsche, Bosch supplies the power electronics, the battery pack, the electric motors for the Cayenne and Panamera and the electric motor installed on the front axle of the 918 Spyder.

918 Spyder: a unique combination of performance and efficiency
The project definition for the 918 Spyder’s development team was to build the super sports car for the next decade with a highly efficient and high performance hybrid drive. The completely new development, which logically started from scratch on a blank piece of paper, allows a new concept without having to make any concessions. The whole car was designed around the hybrid drive. The 918 Spyder thus highlights the potential of hybrid drives, i.e. the simultaneous increase in efficiency and performance, without one coming at the expense of the other. Thanks to the SMG 180/120 electric motor developed by Bosch, the Porsche 918 Spyder has an additional 210 kW (286 hp) of driving power. The electric motor on the front axle of the 918 Spyder delivers a torque of 210 Nm right from the start, while the motor on the rear axle delivers 375 Nm. The result is a total system output of 652 kW (887 hp) with a maximum torque of up to 1,280 Nm, allowing the 918 Spyder to accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in a mere 2.6 seconds. The super sports car’s fuel consumption, on the other hand, is an amazing 3.1 litres per 100 km, making it more efficient in the NEDC test than most of today’s small cars.

Panamera S E-Hybrid and Cayenne S E-Hybrid: fuel consumption of a small car
The driving experience of a sports car combined with the consumption of a small car – the Porsche Cayenne S E-Hybrid and Panamera S E-Hybrid prove that these two are not contradictory to each other. The world’s first plug-in hybrid amongst the premium SUVs with a system output of 306 kW (416 hp) achieves an NEDC fuel consumption of just 3.4 l/100 km. The plug-in hybrid model of the Porsche Gran Turismo, which also has a system output of 306 kW (416 hp) stands out thanks to its weight advantage, rear-wheel drive and low drag, giving it a fuel consumption of just 3.1 l/100 km.

In the plug-in hybrid models of the Porsche Cayenne and Panamera, Bosch’s IMG-300 electric motor provides additional electrical propulsion. It gives a boost of up to 310 Nm of additional torque and provides 70 kW (95 hp) of additional power. The central interface between the electric motor and the battery is the INVCON 2.3 module made by Bosch. The power electronics are the control centre of the electric powertrain, because the system converts the direct current stored as energy in the battery into three-phase alternating current for the electric motor and vice versa. The traction battery stores the electricity in the powertrain. It is made up of prismatic cells with an energy capacity of 9.4 kilowatt hours in the Panamera S E-Hybrid and 10.8 kilowatt hours in the Cayenne S E-Hybrid that can be fully charged from a normal household power socket in less than four hours. Using a high current power supply, the charging time is almost halved to a good two hours.

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Panamera S E-Hybrid:

Panamera S E-Hybrid:

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Electrification and internet in the car

Bosch is linking new technologies to gasoline and diesel

  •     Gasoline engines: 350 bar for direct injection
  •     Diesel engines: 48-volt hybrid to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions
  •     Dr. Rolf Bulander: “Bits and bytes are making cars more efficient”

Paper for download: Dr. Rolf Bulander – Powertrain optimization using a comprehensive systems approach

Lawmakers have mandated economical, low-emission vehicles. Car buyers want vehicles that are safe and that offer more convenience and engine performance. At the International Vienna Motor Symposium 2015, Bosch presented numerous innovations that meet all of these requirements. “Bosch technology is making cars more efficient, more convenient, and more fun to drive,” said Dr. Rolf Bulander, member of the board of management of Robert Bosch GmbH and chairman of the Mobility Solutions business sector. All three aspects come together in the Bosch boost recuperation system. In the New European Driving Cycle, the 48-volt hybrid can cut CO2 emissions by 7 percent (based on compact class). Thanks to its electric-supported coasting, the car offers a smoother ride and can deliver up to 150 Nm more torque on demand.

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Connected electronic horizon: efficiency thanks to real-time data
Innovative advances will transform automotive powertrains over the next few years. “Electrification and connectivity will give a further boost to gasoline and diesel engines,” predicted Bulander. “Bits and bytes are making cars more efficient.” Electrified vehicles stand to gain tremendous benefits from connectivity. They are safer, more efficient, and more fun to drive. One example of how this works is the connected electronic horizon. In the future, this Bosch technology will supply essential traffic information about construction sites, traffic jams, and accidents in real time. From this basis, it will be possible to further improve existing functions such as start-stop coasting. At the same time, plug-in hybrids can use the system to implement a predictive operating strategy. Such technologies can cut CO2 emissions by a double-digit percentage.

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Even after 2020, the vast majority of new cars will be powered by fossil fuels
In his presentation, Bulander reaffirmed that internal-combustion engines will remain the basis of efficient mobility. Even ten years from now, the vast majority of new vehicles worldwide will be powered by fossil fuels. Europe, the U.S., and China will raise the legal requirements for engine efficiency still further over that same period. Starting in 2021, the average new car in the EU will have an emissions cap of 95 g of CO2 per kilometre. Based on the current situation, advances in engine design should make it possible to achieve these values. The CO2 emissions for a gasoline engine in the subcompact class can be reduced to 85 g per kilometre, and for a diesel engine, that figure can be even lower than 70 g per kilometre. Enhanced aerodynamics and reduced rolling friction could once again lead to further improvements. Vehicles in the premium class and SUVs will need additional electrification.

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Engineering turns its attention to real driving emissions
In addition to current emission regulations, engineers are increasingly focusing on real driving emissions. The European Union is discussing whether to introduce real driving emission tests starting in 2017. This measuring method for diesel cars concentrates primarily on the emissions of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide in real-life driving situations. For cars with gasoline direct injection, the focus is on the level of particulates emitted. A number of vehicles currently in production already expel an extremely low amount of emissions – for example, during rapid acceleration or at high speeds. Now it’s time to drive the spread of this capability and develop cost-effective technologies that will ensure compliance, whatever the driving conditions. Bosch presented several approaches at the International Vienna Motor Symposium that support this endeavor. Bulander put special emphasis on interlinking the domains of electrification, automation, and connectivity: “Bosch pools these aspects in the vehicle and creates ideal systems,” he said.

One example of this approach is the innovative direct injection system with laser-drilled spray holes in gasoline engines. The holes’ precise edges swirl the fuel in the combustion chamber in such a way that it burns extremely efficiently. Increasing the injection pressure from 200 to 350 bar cuts particulate emissions to an even greater extent – especially under high load points and dynamic engine operation. Bosch debuted this refined version of its gasoline direct injection system at the Vienna Motor Symposium.

In diesel engines, electrification reduces nitrogen oxide emissions right in the engine, making exhaust gas treatment still more efficient. Bulander demonstrated this by presenting Bosch’s new 48-volt boost recuperation system. Through the judicious application of boosts, the system can markedly reduce untreated nitrogen oxide emissions, especially at high loads or when the car is accelerating. The crucial factor here is that this effect cuts emissions directly at the point of combustion by up to 20 percent. This has the effect of significantly lowering exhaust pipe emissions: Bosch believes the system could allow the storage catalytic converter to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by up to 80 percent. Electrification will also increase the level of efficiency for urea-based systems as well (SCR catalytic converters). These exhaust gas treatment applications consume much less AdBlue, which means the fluid doesn’t need to be refilled as often.

(Source: Bosch Media)

Stereo video camera

Bosch makes emergency braking possible using just a video sensor

Standard feature in the Land Rover Discovery Sport

  • Bosch stereo video camera: single-sensor solution for assistance systems
  • Thanks to its stereo video camera, the Land Rover Discovery Sport received one of the top Euro NCAP test results in the “safety assist” category
  • Bosch’s solution is the smallest stereo video camera for automotive applications currently on the market
  • Stereo video camera meets ASIL B safety standard according to ISO 26262

Emergency braking systems are among the most effective assistance systems in the car. In Germany alone, up to 72 percent of all rear-end collisions resulting in personal injury could be avoided if all vehicles were equipped with them. Now Bosch has developed a stereo video camera with which an emergency braking system can function based solely on camera data. Normally, this would require a radar sensor or a combination of radar and video sensors. “The Bosch stereo video camera is a single-sensor solution that makes various assistance functions affordable for all vehicle classes,” says Dr. Dirk Hoheisel, who sits on the Bosch board of management. Land Rover offers the stereo video camera together with the Bosch emergency braking system as standard in its new Discovery Sport. This system was developed in intensive and close collaboration between Bosch and Land Rover.

When the camera recognizes another vehicle ahead in the lane as an obstruction, the emergency braking system prepares for action. If the driver does not react, then the system initiates maximum braking. The Discovery Sport proved how effective the function is in a Euro NCAP test: it was rated as “good” in the AEB city and AEB interurban categories. Overall, the Discovery Sport passed the test with five stars and achieved one of the best results in the “safety assist” category for 2014. To earn a top score from Euro NCAP in 2016 and beyond, cars must be equipped with predictive pedestrian protection. This can also be based on the stereo video camera. The Discovery Sport has also been awarded the What Car? Car of the Year Safety Award 2015 in the U.K.

Bosch has developed a stereo video camera with which an emergency braking system can function based solely on camera data. Land Rover offers the stereo video camera together with the Bosch emergency braking system as standard in its new Discovery Sport.

Bosch has developed a stereo video camera with which an emergency braking system can function based solely on camera data. Land Rover offers the stereo video camera together with the Bosch emergency
braking system as standard in its new Discovery Sport.

Important building block for automated driving Besides the emergency braking system, the new Land Rover Discovery Sport offers other driver assistance functions, some of which are also based on the Bosch stereo video camera. One such function is road-sign recognition, which keeps the driver informed about the current speed limit. Another is a lane-departure warning system. This vibrates the steering wheel of the Discovery Sport to warn drivers before they unintentionally drift out of lane.

The Bosch stereo video camera sets new technical standards. With its light-sensitive lenses and video sensors, the camera covers a 50-degree horizontal field of vision and can take measurements in 3D at a distance of over 50 meters. Thanks to these spatial measurements, the video signal alone provides enough data to calculate, for example, the distance to vehicles ahead. “The Bosch stereo video camera and its 3D imaging capability are also an important building block for automated driving,” says Hoheisel.  Its pair of highly sensitive video sensors are equipped with colour recognition and CMOS (complementary metal oxide semiconductor) technology. They have a resolution of 1,280 by 960 pixels and can also process high-contrast images. The camera’s high-performance computer makes it possible to integrate other measuring programs and functions and respond flexibly to market requirements.

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Bosch developed the entire stereo video camera in house from start to finish and it sets new technical standards. The distance between the optical axes of the lenses is just twelve centimetres, making this the smallest system of its kind currently available in the field of automotive applications. Thanks to the spatial measurements, the video signal alone provides enough data to calculate, for example, the distance to vehicles ahead.

The smallest stereo video camera currently on the market One of the biggest advantages offered by the Bosch stereo video camera is its compact design. The distance between the optical axes of the lenses is just twelve centimetres, making this the smallest system of its kind currently available in the field of automotive applications. What’s more, the Bosch developers have integrated the control unit for image processing and function control directly into the camera housing. That means vehicle manufacturers can integrate the camera into the rear view mirror especially easily, impeding the field of vision only slightly.

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When the camera recognizes another vehicle ahead in the lane as an obstruction, the emergency braking system prepares for action. If the driver does not react, then the system initiates maximum braking.

“We’re pleased to say that Bosch developed the entire stereo video camera in house from start to finish,” says Hoheisel. As a result, all components, from hardware to image processing to the functions, are designed to work together seamlessly. The Bosch camera also meets the stringent ASIL B safety requirement according to ISO 26262, which is relevant for safety-related emergency braking. In addition, automotive manufacturers can flexibly adapt the range of camera functions as they choose.

(Source: Bosch Media)

Energy Storage for a Sustainable Home

Powerwall

Tesla Home Battery

Powerwall is a home battery that charges using electricity generated from solar panels, or when utility rates are low, and powers your home in the evening. It also fortifies your home against power outages by providing a backup electricity supply. Automated, compact and simple to install, Powerwall offers independence from the utility grid and the security of an emergency backup.

I need one of these now!

New regulations for exhaust-gas analyses in guideline 5

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All new Bosch emission testers work in accordance with the device guideline 5 becoming effective in July 2015

  • New device guideline for tests on Euro 6 vehicles
  •  Simplified test sequence for the exhaust-gas analysis on diesel vehicles
  •  Complying exhaust-gas-analysis guideline 5 with Bosch BEA PC SystemSoft
  •  Repurchase campaigns and Bosch retrofit kits for upgrading to the new guideline 5

A new device guideline has been issued for passenger cars and commercial vehicles meeting the latest emission standard Euro 6. This 5th guideline becomes effective on July 1, 2015. It affects both the operating principle of emission testers and the test sequence. The most important practical change is the simplified test sequence for diesel vehicles without idle-speed limiter. Moreover, the new and globally standardized OBD signal protocols WWH-OBD and SAE J1939 have now also been introduced concomitant with the guideline 5. Another novelty is a test sequence for motorcycles when using software complying with guideline 5. The test sequence for electric vehicles with range extender has also been adjusted.For all vehicles meeting emission standards up to Euro 5, workshops can still rely on guideline 4. However, the simplified test sequence for diesel vehicles cannot be used then. For all passenger cars and commercial vehicles meeting the Euro 6 standard, though, tests have to be performed in accordance with the new guideline 5.For guideline 5: required software comes with data update in May

The new Bosch emission testers BEA 550/950 are already equipped for the exhaust-gas analysis according to guideline 5. The BEA-PC system software also supports the new OBD signal protocols already since October 2014. Workshops with a exhaust-gas-analysis data subscription will receive the software complying with guideline 5 together with the emission-analysis target-data update in May. Of course, workshops can also buy the emission-analysis target data including the guideline 5-compliant software by retail from April onwards. The changes required for the new guideline will be implemented in the BEA-PC software exclusively. Devices still working with the ESA emission-analysis software will thus have to be upgraded to the BEA-PC software from June onwards.The BEA 150, 250, 350 and BEA 460 emission testers should be upgraded by the KTS modules 515, 540 or 570. The KTS 115 and KTS-Card modules used so far do not support the new OBD signal protocols. In addition Bosch developed a laptop retrofit kit for the BEA 150, 250 and 350 series. It allows controlling the devices by means of a laptop having installed the BEA-PC software on it. As a consequence, these devices also comply with the new guideline 5. The speed and temperature measurement modules MTM/MTM Plus should be replaced by the BEA 030.

Bosch and the wholesalers support workshops using older emission testers in upgrading their devices by means of a large variety of retrofit kits, special packages and repurchase campaigns. That way, the workshops are timely equipped for the requirements of guideline 5 and the exhaust-gas analysis on Euro 6 vehicles.

IMI free vehicle diagnostics eLearning resources

IMI has launched a series of online vehicle diagnostics training modules, funded by digital solutions charity Jisc. The resources will be free to access through the IMI’s eLearning platform, acquired in 2014 by the IMI. They are aimed at individuals with a background in car maintenance and level 3 qualifications, providing technicians with an opportunity to brush up their diagnostic skills and learn new ones. Modules will be made available to IMI Members first before becoming accessible to the wider industry.

The project came about as IMI identified diagnostic expertise as a major skills gap in the maintenance of modern vehicles. Six modules have been developed covering the diagnostic procedures for different electrical systems around a vehicle. The resources will take the form of advanced simulations which allow participants to undertake the diagnostic process in a virtual environment.

IMI CEO Steve Nash commented, “Up-skilling the sector is a central objective for IMI and the Jisc funding has provided us with an excellent opportunity to provide valuable CPD resources, free of charge to the sector. Modern vehicle technology continues to advance at pace and diagnostic expertise is becoming ever more critical part of the vehicle servicing process. It was this situation, coupled with the high profile of IMI and the established expertise of Tom Denton and his team that led Jisc to awarding us with the funds to develop these resources.”

The new resources will offer an opportunity for IMI to leverage its eLearning platform, which is currently utilised in over 200 colleges in the UK, to support the wider motor industry. IMI already hosts a portfolio of CPD learning opportunities built around partnerships with training providers around the UK.

About IMI

IMI is the professional association for individuals working in the motor industry, and the authoritative voice of the sector. IMI is transforming the automotive industry by setting, upholding and promoting professional standards – driving skills acquisition, establishing clearer career paths, and boosting public confidence. IMI’s online Professional Register is here to make sure consumers are in skilled, competent and trustworthy hands.

Please visit www.theimi.org.uk to find out more.

Follow us on Twitter – @The_imi

Find us on Facebook – www.facebook.com/theimipage

NEW CITROËN AIRCROSS CONCEPT CAR

Aircross boasts unique presence among SUVs with its overall balance and flowing design, giving the protective and welcoming concept car a strong identity and a resolutely optimistic spirit. – CONSUMMATE COMFORT FOR EXTRA ENERGY: The cabin brings occupants a new approach to car travel with a modern, bright, fresh and functional design generating physical and mental well-being. – TECHNOLOGICAL INTELLIGENCE FOR RELAXED MOBILITY: Dialogue and sharing are facilitated in a connected SUV with outstanding graphic interfaces and equipped with plug-in hybrid technology.

As it celebrates its 50 millionth car sold since the creation of the Brand some 95 years ago, CITROËN is unveiling a surprising, creative and bold new concept car, one that confirms its ability to develop a positioning that is:

– INTERNATIONAL: CITROËN Aircross illustrates the Brand’s international ambitions, rolling out its positioning initiated with the C4 Cactus with a body style intended for sale around the world.

– DIFFERENT: CITROËN Aircross shakes up design cues while respecting SUV essentials. Drawing on the product and styling traits of the C4 Cactus, the body design and cabin ambience express a sense of modernity and a singular spirit. The new concept car shows CITROËN’s ability to assert its identity in all vehicle segments.

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The CITROËN Aircross concept car successfully builds on the achievements of the C4 Cactus with:

– A SINGULAR ATTITUDE: Blending power and positive energy, CITROËN Aircross is a protective and welcoming SUV. The resolutely optimistic vehicle casts off any sense of aggression in favor of:

A singular, pure and optimistic personality, through the overall balance of the body styling, with a horizontal emphasis and underscored by flowing and organic forms punctuated by strong graphic components including “Alloy Bumps” and “Air Signs”. The global result is heightened by orange-red body paint symbolizing energy and serenity and innovative materials denoting robustness;

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A styling approach emphasizing functionality and aerodynamics.

– An INVITATION TO TRAVEL in a cabin bringing an immediate sense of consummate comfort and the generation of energy. Everything inside CITROËN Aircross was designed to foster physical and mental well-being. In addition to the physical comfort provided by the broad and generous seats, well-being is further heightened by warm materials and a blend of light and invigorating colors. The purely-drawn lines with their crosswise emphasis suggest space, while the ample geometric shapes structure the uncluttered interior, each one combining aesthetics with functionality. CITROËN Aircross posits a new take on the travel theme with specially designed storage compartments and the use of straps in a fresh and contemporary cabin inviting passengers to take to the road together and in their own style.

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– TECHNOLOGICAL INTELLIGENCE harnessed for practicality, with occupants able to choose between sharing and an individual experience. The concept car is equipped with two 12-inch HD screens, one of which is mobile and can be passed from one passenger to another. Each seat is equipped with speakers and microphones to encourage dialogue between passengers. Technological intelligence is also expressed in the choice of a plug-in hybrid drivetrain, combining efficiency and top-level performance. CITROËN Aircross features meaningful technologies for relaxed mobility and a new travelling experience.

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The CITROËN Aircross concept car will be unveiled at the Shanghai Motor Show, a symbolic choice of venue given the importance of the Chinese market for CITROËN, accounting as it does for 25% of total sales and standing as the Brand’s number-one market.

 

Bosch transmission control units

Customer benefit: Compared to manual transmissions, modern automatic transmissions enhance driving comfort and also save on fuel, which is because they independently determine the point at which the engine runs most efficiently. In series-produced vehicles, there are now up to nine gears to choose from.

High-tech: Modern transmissions are equipped with a great deal of digital intelligence so that they are always capable of identifying the engine’s ideal operating point. Bosch supplies the control units, sensors, and solenoid valves for all major types of transmissions. The control unit is a high-tech miniature computer that enables the complex operation of different types of automatic transmissions. The processing capacity of a modern transmission control unit is an incredible 160 times more powerful than that of the computer used for the first lunar flight.

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A wide range of automatic transmissions featuring Bosch controls:

Traditional automatic: The tried-and-tested transmission shifts automatically using programs stored in the control unit. In many cars, the driver also has the option of shifting to another gear with switches on the steering wheel, which prevents shifting errors. The traditional automatic often has six gears, though some ultra-efficient versions now feature up to nine gears.

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Automated manual transmission: This type of transmission combines the best of an automatic and manual transmission. It offers the comfort and convenience of an automatic with the individual control of a manual transmission. The clutch remains open when idle and only uses energy when being closed. This transmission therefore also saves fuel, reducing CO2 emissions in the process.

Dual-clutch transmission: This particular model actually comprises two separate transmissions. One is used for the even gear set and the other for the odd. Two clutches shift back and forth between both transmissions within a split second, allowing for especially swift gear changes. The complex coordination in a dual-clutch transmission is only made possible by a sophisticated transmission control system with powerful processing such as that offered by Bosch.

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CVT: CVT (continuously variable transmission) is an automatic without any fixed shifting point, which completely eliminates shifting response delays. As a result, the driver can accelerate without any interruption as the driving force is available at all times. The vehicle does not have to shift back and forth between fixed shifting points – a feature that provides extra driving comfort, especially when going up an incline. CVT is widespread in Asia and North America.

eClutch: The Bosch eClutch introduces the comfort of an automatic to a manual transmission in a cost-effective way. Thanks to this innovative technology, drivers can go into first gear simply by stepping on the gas pedal. The eClutch automates the clutch only, not the transmission. The clutch pedal transmits an electric signal to an actuator, which decouples the clutch. This affordable alternative to a fully automatic transmission is especially useful for drivers of compact cars that frequently find themselves in stop-and-go traffic within urban settings. The eClutch also represents an appealing option for drivers in emerging markets.

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The future of transmission technology at Bosch

Coasting: Thanks to the eClutch, manual transmissions can also benefit from the fuel-saving coasting function, which is otherwise only possible with modern automatic transmissions. Coasting expands on the well-known start-stop function and enables additional fuel savings of up to ten percent. When this function is used, the engine not only switches off at traffic lights, but also while the vehicle is moving.

Electronic horizon: Bosch is driving forward connecting transmissions with the latest available navigation information. Navigation systems know the lay of the land and can transmit this data to the automatic transmission, which, in turn, can shift into neutral and use the residual momentum if city limits are coming up after a long bend, for example. This even more intelligent automatic transmission with electronic horizon can provide additional double-digit fuel savings.

Further information is available online at www.bosch.com and www.bosch-press.com, http://twitter.com/BoschPresse.

Coil-on-plug and signal probe

The latest design of Coil-on-plug (COP) and signal probe from Pico Technology is the fastest way you can check coil-on-plug ignition coils and spark plugs.

  • Find misfires fast
  • Displays scope patterns of the secondary, faster than scoping the primary
  • Works on all automotive scopes capable of displaying ignition patterns
  • Can also be used to investigate injectors and other inductive actuators
  • Flexible design allows for easier access to hard-to-reach components
  • No batteries required

Compatible with any Pico Automotive scope, the COP and signal probe can also pick up injector and actuator waveforms on a wide variety of vehicle makes and models. You can buy the probe on its own or with a special grounded cable.

COP tester

For more information, please visit the Coil-on-plug and signal probe page on their website.

 

Internet of ‘car-things’

Cars still have their best days ahead of them. Connecting vehicles to the internet makes them safer, more fun to drive, and reduces fuel consumption. In the future, this Bosch technology will provide real-time information about mobile construction zones, traffic jams, and accidents. On this basis, further improvements to existing functions such as start-stop coasting will be possible. At the same time, it will enable a predictive operating strategy for plug-in hybrids. Technologies such as this reduce CO2 emissions by up to 10 percent or more.

The reductions to consumption brought by start-stop coasting and an optimum operating strategy are most noticeable in real traffic conditions. In the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC), however, they have no effect. Using up-to-date maps, cars can precisely calculate their remaining range in addition to the most efficient route. At the same time, intelligent connectivity increases the suitability of electrified vehicles for everyday use. In only ten years, more than 15 % of new vehicles worldwide will be electrified. Of these, more than 13 million new vehicles will be able to run on electricity alone, at least in urban traffic.

Technically-sophisticated components make vehicles more economical and efficient, allowing them to meet the strict CO2 targets set by the European Commission. European regulations stipulate that in 2021, new vehicles will be allowed to emit an average of only 95 grams of CO2 per kilometre. This corresponds to just over four litres of fuel consumed per hundred kilometres. In 2013, new vehicles emitted an average of 132.9 grams of CO2 per kilometre. The EU recognizes especially environmentally-friendly technologies as “eco-innovations.” Automakers can use these as CO2 credits to reduce their fleet consumption levels. The maximum possible credit is 7 grams per kilometre.

(Source: Bosch)